I originally was going to use this blog post to write about ant control, but just as I got into the office today in Nampa, I was shown a sign that changed my mind!  The sign came in the form of one of the biggest spiders I’ve ever seen crawl out from under my desk.  First, I performed a pest control service in the time honored old fashioned way–I stomped him into oblivion (see picture at the bottom).  Second, I shelved the ant blog post, and wrote this one about spiders.

As fall temperatures come to the Boise area, we will (as we do every year) begin to see an increase of spider activity indoors.  Though this may not come as welcome news to you and your family (especially the person so afraid of spiders they jump on the nearest couch and scream bloody murder….you know who you are), there is still hope!

So in order to offer some relief to your fear laden minds, let me dispel a common myth that may give you some peace of mind.

For whatever the reason, there is a rumor out there that pesticides do nothing to kill spiders.  This is patently false!  Safe exterior and interior applications are effective both on contact and as a residual treatment (see Utah State’s fact sheet , or University of Idaho’s fact sheet .)

We recommend treating the exterior at least quarterly to provide a consistent barrier around your home.  Doing the inside of the garage at least once a year we feel is a good idea, probably in the fall.

Spiders, including the Hobo Spiders and the Black Widow spider certainly are controllable via chemical applications; here are some other things you can do to keep them out:

  • Remove webs!  Sweep them off, hose them off, blow them off.
  • Seal crack in foundation, install screens on doors and windows, make sure doors and windows are properly sealed with calk, etc.
  • Clear out debris from around the home:  Woodpiles, construction materials, etc., should be as far away from the home as possible.
  • Vacuum, dust, and sweep regularly
  • Decrease the amount of nighttime lights that attract insects that are potential food for spiders.  Use yellow colored light bulbs where possible as they are less attractive to insects.
  • Keep all vegetation well-trimmed and at least 1 foot away from the home.  Lawns should be cut to a proper height, and cut regularly.

Spider stomped!  Though not the best picture, this is the spider that came out from under my desk…..this picture has no educational value, it simply makes me feel better:

 

 Spider